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Friday, June 25, 2010

What is Architecture Minimalist? Minimalist House Design


The roots of minimalism in architecture is often traced back to the mid to late 1950s. Movement is a reaction to the new style of architecture - and lifestyle - which is being cultivated in the United States. In the U.S. boom in the years after World War II, there is a movement towards a large and exaggerated style of the building. During this era, groomed suburbs and supermarkets all over the map of the cave appeared, and there was a tendency garnish it. Minimalism was developed as a response to a lifestyle that increasingly commercial and consumer are reflected in the design.

Despite the minimalist art (which is sometimes known as a literalist art) has its roots in America, minimalist architecture was born elsewhere. Northern Europe, especially Scandinavia, and Japan is very important in the history of minimalist design, and in fact, this place remains one of the biggest embracers minimalism.

In general, the idea of minimalism can be described as "less is more," or as some designers and architects are fond of saying, "do more with less" minimalist architects use space as a design feature in and of itself .. Rather than attempting to fill the space with features, they create designs where space is as carefully thought out and used as the things they add to the room. basic shapes and straight, clean lines that are also important techniques used in minimalist designs, such as playing with various types of illumination. The result is elegant but not fussy.

Another technique often used is to provide a feature that more than one use. One example might be the floor beneath the heating unit, either form the basis for the room and heating room. This allows the designer to create the optimal utility without crowding the space.

Some of the important architects working in the field of minimalist design includes:
  • Lugdwig Mies van der Rohe
  • Buckminster Fuller
  • Dieter Rams
  • Luis Barragan
  • John Pawson
  • Eduardo Souto de Mouro
  • Alvar Siza
  • Tadao Ando
  • Alberto Campo Baeza
  • Yoshi Tanigushi
  • Peter Zumthor
  • Richard Gluckman
  • Michael Gabellini
  • Claudio Silverstrin
  • Vincent Van Duysen

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